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Introducing the all new KPPS2000... By popular demand, the newest addition to Australia’s premier range of HDPE pump stations. The original & the best.

0843-APSS-Pumpstation-Blog-post
Our Kwikflo packaged pump stations are assembled at our Sydney manufacturing facility and designed to meet your specific application, for example sewage pump stations or stormwater pump systems.

Contact your sales representative for more information.

Kwikflo Models



Why do things crack? In a word: vibrations. Vibrations plus fatigue equal failure.

rleishear-vibration-featured

Author: Robert A. Leishear

Why do things crack? In a word: vibrations. Vibrations plus fatigue equal failure, where cyclic fatigue loading flexes parts or equipment back and forth until they crack. A major breakthrough in vibration theory is presented here, along with an vibration introduction and examples of pump damages.

Lord Rayleigh described vibrations in his “Theory of Sound”, which was published in the late 1800’s, but resonance has only recently been fully described. To do so, Newton’s differential equations of motion were solved by this author to establish new theory in a 2017 Pressure Vessel and Piping Conference paper (Shock Waves, Vibrations, and Resonance in Linearly Elastic Beams). In short, every structure or machine, and every component therein, vibrates at multiple frequencies, known as higher mode natural frequencies. These frequencies can now be graphically visualized. In particular, when motor speeds for a machine nearly equal any natural frequency, the vibrations are multiplied at that frequency to cause equipment damages.

Vibration Theory

The simplest example of vibration is a spring with a weight attached to it, where the spring has some damping. This spring-mass-damper system defines a single degree of freedom system, where this single vibration provides a simple description for real systems. A vibrating spring has a period that equals the time required to complete one vibration cycle; a frequency that equals the inverse of the period; an amplitude, or magnitude, of vibration; and a damping coefficient that controls the decrease in vibration magnitude to reach a constant equilibrium, or static, value that may or may not equal zero.

normalized-vibration-amplitude

Vibration model of a weight dropped from a spring at rest

experimental-dynamic-stresses-due-to-a-traveling-pressure-wave-in-a-pipeExperimental Dynamic Stresses Due to a Traveling Pressure Wave in a Pipe

To better understand vibrations, consider the case of a constant force suddenly applied to a spring, i.e., a weight dropped from a spring at rest. To summarize this vibration performance, the dynamic load factor, or DLF, equals the maximum vibration amplitude (or stress) divided by the vibration amplitude (or stress) at the equilibrium or static condition. The DLF is reduced by damping, where common damping values in structures typically range between 1% and 2%, but may be as high as 10% or more. For suddenly applied loads in the absence of damping, the maximum DLF equals 2. The DLF may be further reduced due to the rate of loading or duration of loading. This application of DLF’s yields reasonable vibration approximations, when a load is applied perpendicular to a component surface. However, if that same load travels inside apipe, the DLF equals four (Leishear, 2013, Fluid Mechanics, Water Hammer, Dynamic Stresses, and Piping Design, ASME Press text book). The theory of DLF’s explained hundreds of thousands of piping failures (Water Main Failures – A Billion Dollar a year problem, Empowering Pumps). This very brief vibration introduction leads into a discussion of resonance.

Resonance Theory

When motor vibrations are applied to a pump, the pump reacts much differently than when subjected to a constant load. If the motor speed equals a natural frequency of that component, vibrations will significantly increase beyond expectations. In fact, vibrations would increase to infinity in the absence of damping, where damping reduces resonance effects to agree with observations. In short, maximum resonance occurs when the motor speed equals any one of the natural frequencies of components, where this phenomenon has finally been described after hundreds of years of vibration theory advances.

As examples, 1) structural vibrations of attached piping and equipment supports may vibrate at any one of their natural frequencies to crack that piping. 2) Vibration is a common failure cause for mechanical seals in pumps. 3) Damaged components like ball bearings vibrate at their natural frequencies, such that races, cages, and balls of that bearing each vibrate at their own frequencies – a very complex process.

new-theory-resonance-or-critical-speeds-of-a-motor-cycling-a-pump-shaft-or-beam
New Theory: Resonance or Critical Speeds of a Motor Cycling a Pump Shaft or Beam

vibration-velocity-acceptance-criteria
Vibration Velocity Acceptance Criteria

Vibration and Resonance Acceptance Criteria

For rotating equipment, a simple approach to assess vibration damage was presented in a 1950’s ASME Magazine article, and this approach is still used by many today. Measured vibrations are compared to acceptance limits for installed rotating equipment, such as fans, pumps, or compressors. Troubleshooting vibration problems requires that the vibration of the defective component be determined and corrected. Troubleshooting may sound simple, but a thorough knowledge of equipment construction, vibration principles, and equipment operations is essential to solve vibration failure problems. Prediction of specific rotating equipment vibration problems in advance is problematic, at best.

A Pump Motor Failure Example

For example, consider the failure of a ball bearing assembly in a 150 horsepower motor that operated a connected pump. The motor was reported to be noisier than usual, and could be heard at a distance of fifty feet from the motor. The ball bearings in the motor are constructed of inner and outer races that the balls roll between, and cages that separate the balls. The balls, cages, and races each have a specific frequency, and the ball spin frequency was displayed in the frequency spectrum since they were damaged. One of the bearings, the thrust bearing, was completely destroyed, and one of the races and several cages were broken. The other bearing vibrated at its ball spin frequencies, and the bearing that had not been destroyed. The vibrations were above 0.1 inch per second, and the bearings were in fact damaged. At the thrust bearing, the vibrations at the destroyed bearing location were lower than 0.1 inches per second. Since the thrust bearing was no longer in contact with the shaft, there were no associated vibrations. That is, the measured vibrations were not caused by the destroyed bearing assembly at all, but were measured from the bearing assembly that remained in service and was experiencing bearing vibration damages of its own. What about the noise levels? The vibrations of the bearing were inadequate to cause the low frequency rumbling sounds that were heard, where the vibration occurred at the frequencies of the grating on the steel mounting platform. In other words, the bearing vibration caused the platform to rattle the gratings enough to be heard fifty feet away. This resonance issue was far from obvious at the onset of troubleshooting, as with many complex vibration failures. The invention of new theory that is discussed here provides practicing engineers a new tool to better understand vibration failures.

frequencies-of-vibration-for-a-damaged-ball-bearing-assembly
Frequencies of Vibration for a Damaged Ball Bearing Assembly

ROBERT A. LEISHEAR, an ASME Fellow, is a consulting engineer for Leishear Engineering, LLC, and he has a Ph. D in Mechanical Engineering and a nearly completed Ph.D. in Nuclear Engineering. Dr. Leishear has published nearly 70 publications on water hammer, vibrations, fluid mechanics, pumps, and explosions.

The simple design of the 28 series, along with a wide offering of options, ensures there is a variant for every application along with the assurance of long life.

featured-banner-jabsco-flexible-impeller-pumps
  • Based on technology that Jabsco first patented over 80 years ago
  • The output flow is smooth, steady and pulsation-free
  • The gentle pumping action will not break down shearsensitive or fragile liquids
  • Cream fillings, jams, sauces and pie fillings that contain fruit pieces are handled with ease
Ease of maintenance
  • Single moving part (the impeller) greatly simplifies maintenance
  • Just four screws to remove the end cover for easy inspection and replacement of impeller if necessary
  • Four more screws allows access to maintain mechanical seals
Rugged design

Jabsco pumps are regarded by many as the best of their type on the market with:

  • 316 SS wetted parts, standard on Jabsco Flexible Impeller Pumps
  • Long-life, durable flexible impellers
  • Market-leading mechanical seals are external to pumped media
  • High grade large bearings in pedestal pump variants
  • Wide diameter precision ground shafts
  • Design allows pump to pass hard particles, such as bones and seeds, without stalling
Installation benefits
  • Compact pump size – more space efficient than alternative pumping technologies
  • Reversible operation – makes the pump adaptable to differing situations
  • High dry-priming ability of up to five meters – allowing for convenient and safe installation positions for bulk transfer and decanting


jabsco-flexible-impeller-pumps-03
jabsco-flexible-impeller-pumps-04
jabsco-flexible-impeller-pumps-05
Especially suited for:
  • Ingredient unloading and transfer
  • Tank filling and emptying
  • Recirculation and mixing
  • Portion and container filling
  • Sampling, filtration and more
  • Brine injection
Applications include:
  • Food and beverage
  • Personal care products and cosmetics
  • Industrial fluid products
Features & Options
  • Dry self-priming
  • Chemically compatible 316 grade stainless steel parts
  • Polished internal surfaces
  • Hygienic elastomer impeller leaves no taste or odor
  • Standard and hard face mechanical seals
  • Flushing arrangement for mechanical seals
  • Elastomer materials certified to latest US 3A Standard and FDA, EN1935: 2004 for EPDM and nitrile compounds
  • Pump design certified to latest US 3A Standard
  • Variety of port and impeller material options
  • Rugged heavy-duty construction
  • Serviceable end covers, wear plates, impellers, mechanical seals, shafts bearings
  • 3A variants with hygienic impeller compounds
  • Port options – tri-clamp, IDF, ACME 3A, DIN 11851, SMS, RJT

28 Series Flexible Impeller Pumps

jabsco-flexible-impeller-pumps
The simple design of the 28 series, along with a wide offering of options, ensures there is a variant for every application along with the assurance of long life.

28 Series Flexible Impeller Pumps Technical Specifications

jabsco-flexible-impeller-pumps-flow-rates

Model Mounting IEC Motor Flange/Frame Size Max Solids Size Size (LxWxH) Dimensions Foot to Shaft Pedestal Drive Shaft OD/Close Coupled Stubshaft ID Weight
28200 Pedestal N/A 8mm 169mm x 112mm x 147mm 71.25mm 14mm 2.9kg
28220 Close couple B3/B14/IEC80 8mm 116mm x 112mm x 112mm N/A 19mm 2.5kg
28300 Pedestal N/A 12mm 181mm x 121mm x 160mm 79.75mm 19mm 4.4kg
28320 Close couple B3/B14/IEC80 12mm 135mm x 121mm x 121mm N/A 19mm 3.5kg
28400 Pedestal N/A 16mm 260mm x 157mm x 190mm 89.75mm 24mm 9.4kg
28420 Close couple B3/B14/IEC90 16mm 165mm x 157mm x 157mm N/A 24mm 6.7kg
28500 Pedestal N/A 18mm 331mm x 186mm x 218mm 99.75mm 31mm 14.7kg
28520 Close couple B3/B14IEC100 18mm 192mm x 186mm x 186mm N/A 28mm 10.2kg
28600 Pedestal N/A 18mm 476mm x 198mm x 224mm 99.75mm 32mm 20kg
28620 Close couple B3/B14/IEC132 18mm 282mm x 198mm x 198mm N/A Use special motor shaft 15kg

* Check hydraulics when handling viscous fluids.
This is an approximate selection guide only. Full details of flow, pressure, viscosity and suction conditions are required to enable exact selection.

About Jabsco

brand-jabsco
brand-jabsco-products
Jabsco pumps by Xylem have been in the industry for over 40 years, manufacturing industrial pumps for a wide variety of applications. Jabsco HyLine and Ultima positive displacement rotary lobe pumps are designed to pump delicate, viscous and particle-laden fluids as well as thin liquids which require an all stainless steel pump. The design of Jabsco Lobe Pumps is influenced by some fundamental engineering principles and it is useful to understand these first to ensure their most effective selection and operation.

All Pumps has been importing, servicing and supplying Jabsco pumps in Australia for 20 years and support the full Jabsco range of pumps and spare parts.

Know More



Jabsco rotary lobe pumps are well suited to the chemical & industrial, food & beverage, personal care & cosmetics and pharmaceutical processing markets.

jabsco-rotary-lobe-pumps-features

Jabsco has a 40-year track record of producing exceptionally reliable lobe pumps used in a variety of industries:

  • Non-contacting synchronized lobes able to process large-size soft solids
  • SS316L pump head capable of high pressures and smooth flow
  • Hygienic approvals available for food and pharmaceutical use
Wide range of standard options
  • Multiple rotor forms
  • Choice of pressure relief and temperature control options
  • Many seal configurations and materials to choose from
  • Alternative Surface finishes selections
  • All stainless steel construction available
  • 3A, EHEDG and ATEX approvals
  • 3.1 certification packs
Robust design
  • Large diameter shafts withstand pressure
  • High-grade taper bearings for long life
  • Precision engineered pump head
  • Wide helical gear design for quiet running
  • White Epoxy-coated bearing housing and gear cover as standard
  • All-stainless steel option available
High volumetric efficiency
  • Bi-lobe Scimitar and Tri-lobe form rotors available and interchangeable to suit both hydraulic performance and personal tastes
  • Both rotor forms available in high efficiency or high
Jabsco rotary lobe pump are well suited to the chemical & industrial, food & beverage, personal care & cosmetics and Pharmaceutical processing markets. With a comprehensive range of 5 main pump sizes, the 3A, FDA, EN1935-2004 approved HP series and Ultra – hygienic EHEDG approved UL series Jabsco can quickly and efficiently provide lobe pump for your process and the technical support needed to assure end customer satisfaction. For low flows ,ask about our EHEDG 55 and 3A FDA S2 series.

Easy maintenance
  • All pumps supplied with rotor retainer and seal removal tooling
  • Front loading single shaft seals, simple in design, are fully accessible without disturbing the process pipework
  • Scimitar rotors require no timing adjustment
  • Comprehensive user manual with step-by-step maintenance instructions including spare parts guide, provided with new, pumps


jabsco-rotary-lobe-pumps-01
jabsco-rotary-lobe-pumps-02
jabsco-rotary-lobe-pumps-03
Especially suited for:
  • Ingredient unloading and transfer
  • Tank filling and emptying
  • Recirculation and mixing
  • Portion and container filling
  • Sampling and filtration
Applications include:
  • Chemical and industrial
  • Food and beverage
  • Personal care products and cosmetics
  • Pharmaceutical

HP/UL Rotary Lobe Pumps

jabsco-rotary-lobe-pumps
The 3A/FDA/EN1935-2004 approved design comes with C/SS, C/SiC SiC/SiC rotors, Nitrile, EPDM, Viton or PTFE elastomers and supports end cover relief valves and temperature control jackets.

The UL range mirrors the HP range. It comes with C/SiC as standard and employs a EHEDG-tested and approved design with Scimitar rotors. This hygienically-designed end cover and port joint gaskets, with EPDM to USP class VI, ensures maximum assurance when it is needed.

HP/UL Rotary Lobe Pumps Technical Specifications

jabsco-rotary-lobe-pumps-flow-rates

Model Port Size Displacement Per 100 Revs. Max Flow Max Pressure Max Speed Size (LxWxH) Bare Shaft Weight Temperature Viscosity
HP32 19mm or
25mm
3.5 Litres 52 LPM 15 bar 1500 RPM 213mm x
192mm x
166mm
8k -30° to 140°C 1 to 1 million cP
HP34 25mm or
38mm
7 Litres 105 LPM 8 bar 1500 RPM 299mm x
192mm x
166mm
10kg
HP/UL42 25mm or
38mm
12.3 Litres 123 LPM 15 bar 1000 RPM 274mm x
223mm x
196mm
18kg
HP/UL44 38mm or
50mm
20.4 Litres 204 LPM 8 bar 1000 RPM 290mm x
223mm x
196mm)
20kg
HP/UL52 38mm or
50mm
26.5 Litres 265 LPM 15 bar 1000 RPM 386mm x
249mm x
208mm
32kg
HP/UL54 50mm or
76mm
45.5 Litres 455 LPM 8 bar 1000 RPM 414mm x
259mm x
213mm
35kg
HP/UL62 50mm,
63mm or
76mm
64 Litres 461 LPM 15 bar 720 RPM 460mm x
270mm x
311mm
61kg
HP/UL64 76mm or
100mm
95 Litres 684 LPM 8 bar 720 RPM 464mm x
302mm x
311mm
65kg
HP/UL72 76mm or
100mm
123 Litres 836 LPM 15 bar 680 RPM 486mm x
380mm x
363mm
125kg
HP/UL74 100mm or
152mm
205 Litres 1230 LPM 8 bar 600 RPM 526mm x
386mm x
363mm
145kg
HP/UL76 127mm or
152mm
301.5 Litres 1809 LPM 5 bar 600 RPM 573mm x
412mm x
363mm
165kg

* Check hydraulics when handling viscous fluids.
This is an approximate selection guide only. Full details of flow, pressure, viscosity and suction conditions are required to enable exact selection.

About Jabsco

brand-jabsco
brand-jabsco-products
Jabsco pumps by Xylem have been in the industry for over 40 years, manufacturing industrial pumps for a wide variety of applications. Jabsco HyLine and Ultima positive displacement rotary lobe pumps are designed to pump delicate, viscous and particle-laden fluids as well as thin liquids which require an all stainless steel pump. The design of Jabsco Lobe Pumps is influenced by some fundamental engineering principles and it is useful to understand these first to ensure their most effective selection and operation.

All Pumps has been importing, servicing and supplying Jabsco pumps in Australia for 20 years and support the full Jabsco range of pumps and spare parts.

Know More



We have a customised council support program tailored based on the continuous feedback received from councils.

councils-featured-products
C Series Submersible

c-series-submersible-tsurumi-pump

Sabre Borehole Pump Range

sabre-borehole-pump-range-sabre-submersible-pumps

KPPS Series Pump Station

kpss-series-pump-station-kwikflo-pump-stations-and-trade-waste

Steam Pressure Washers

steam-pressure-washers

Above Ground Storage

above-ground-storage-hydrostor-industrial

Vertical Multistage Range

vertical-multistage-range-grundfos

Self Priming Range

self-priming-range-hydroprime

Undeground Water Storage

underground-water-storage-spel

About All Pumps

allpumps-logo-318px
With over 40 years of experience, All Pumps Sales & Service has been dedicated to providing solutions in all fields of fluid handling. We have been customising pumps to the exact requirements of clients in the civil and building industries with a range of robust, reliable pumps and environmentally approved pollution control systems.

All Pumps is happy to take any inquiries, and is ready to help with your requirements today! Contact Us



Changes to the piping system can help AODD pumps work beyond their typical applications.

aodd-pumps-high-viscosity-featured
by Paul McGarry
January 31, 2018
A common question asked by users of air operated double diaphragm (AODD) pumps is, “What is the maximum viscosity of a process fluid that can be transferred by an AODD pump?” In truth, the answer has little to do with the selected pump and much to do with the piping system to which the pump is connected. Users often forget this, since most AODD applications are transfer applications with a relatively low viscosity fluid. While a complete discussion of more accurate methods for evaluating pump systems is beyond the scope of this article, pump users can employ the following techniques to estimate the factors that impact flow rates in AODD systems with high viscosity fluids.

Consider the following simple fluid transfer system in which the user wants to transfer 20 gallons per minute (gpm) using a 1-inch AODD. To determine if an application is possible, three questions must be answered:

1. Can the pump draw fluid at the desired flow rate through the suction line?

An approximate answer to this question can be found by comparing the pump’s dry-lift rating to the suction line loss. In other words, does the pump’s dry-lift capability exceed the suction line loss at the desired flow rate?

2. Can the pump overcome the system’s total dynamic head (TDH)?

When considering AODD applications, it is beneficial to consider TDH in terms of pounds per square inch (psi) rather than feet of water (ft-H20) for the simple reason that the energy source for AODDs is compressed air. If the air inlet pressure exceeds the systems TDH, then fluid can be transferred in the pump system. For pump longevity, AODD users should strive to design systems that operate in the mid-range of the pump’s capabilities. No more than 60 psi of TDH is a reasonable design goal for most transfer systems.

3. To what degree should the pump be derated, given the operating conditions?

Most manufacturers publish viscosity correction curves. The curves, in effect, summarize the frictional losses that occur when viscous fluid pass through the pump.

Considering Question 1

To determine if the pump can draw in the process fluid, it is necessary to calculate the suction line loss for the desired flow rate.

A discussion of the mathematics of suction line loss is too in-depth for this article. However, pipe diameter and flow rate impact line loss tremendously. It is not uncommon to increase the diameter of the suction line to overcome suction line loss. Consider the following results for suction line loss calculations in the example system in Figure 1.

aod-all-flo-figure-1-allpumps
Figure 1. Example system (Images courtesy of All-Flo)

A typical 1-inch AODD may have dry lift capabilities of 15 ft-H20 or 6.5 psi. In practical terms, this means the pump cannot operate in systems where suction line loss exceeds 6.5 psi. Using a 1-inch suction line as depicted in Figure 1 results in a suction line loss that exceeds the pump’s capabilities. To meet the desired flow rate of 20 gpm, the suction line diameter must be increased to 2 inches. This increase reduces the suction line loss from 34 psi to 2 psi, well within the operating capabilities of the AODD pump.

Considering Question 2

To calculate the TDH of the entire system, both the total static head and the discharge frictional line loss must be determined. See the example system in Table 1.

aod-all-flo-table-1-allpumps
Table 1. Frictional pipe loss

The frictional line loss due to a 1-inch line exceeds the maximum operating pressure of most AODD pumps (120 psi). It becomes necessary to increase the discharge line diameter to reduce the losses to a level within the range of the AODD pump.

Increasing the discharge line diameter from 1 inch to 1-1/2 inches reduces the discharge line loss from 135 psi to 24 psi, a comfortable level for AODD pumps.

In the example system the static head is a simple calculation (10 ft-H20 to 15 ft-H20) x 1.2 S.G., or 6 ft-H20. Expressed in psi, the total static head is approximately -2.6 psi. Therefore, the system’s TDH is 31 psi—the sum of the static head and the frictional pipe losses.

aod-all-flo-table-2-allpumps
Table 2. Frictional line loss

Considering Question 3

The final step in the rough approximation is to consider the line losses as the process fluid moves through the pump. AODD manufacturers typically publish pump curves for water. Viscosity correction curves de-rate the pump’s capacity for process fluids with higher viscosities. For the example system, the manufacturer’s table advises that, with 1,500 cps, the pump will operate at 88 percent of its published capacity. When reading the manufacturer’s published curves one should therefore read 20 gpm at 23 gpm (20 gpm/0.88).

Referring to the adjusted example system, two changes were made—suction line diameter increased to 2 inches and discharge line diameter increased to 1.5 inches. Finally, we must determine the air-inlet pressure of the AODD.

Figure 2 is a typical example of a published pump curve from an AODD manufacturer. The horizontal axis typically represents the flow rate in gpm or liters per minute (lpm), and the vertical axis typically represents both system pressure and air operating pressure.

aod-all-flo-figure-2-allpumps
Figure 2. Typical published performance curve

In Figure 2, the red lines represent air consumption in standard cubic feet per minute (SCFM) and the blue lines represent air inlet pressure in psi. Reading the curve for our sample system (23 gpm and 31 psi TDH) shows that air-inlet pressure should be set at approximately 55 psi and the pump will consume 22 SCFM of air while operating. It is important to note that exceeding the required air pressure of 55 psi can result in cavitation as suction line losses may exceed the capabilities of the pump.

In this simplified system analysis, many important factors have been ignored. However, this example demonstrates the impact system factors have on an AODD pump’s ability to process viscous fluids.

Viscosity and pipe diameter play a significant role in suction line loss and must be considered during evaluation. The system capabilities are limited by the pump’s suction lift capabilities and air-inlet pressure.